Eupithecia albibaltea

Eupithecia albibaltea

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Animalia

Phylum:
Arthropoda

Class:
Insecta

Order:
Lepidoptera

Family:
Geometridae

Genus:
Eupithecia

Species:
E. albibaltea

Binomial name

Eupithecia albibaltea
Prout, 1958[1]

Eupithecia albibaltea is a moth in the family Geometridae. It is found in north-eastern India and Sikkim.[2]
References[edit]

^ Taxapad
^ Eupithecia atrisignis Butler, 1889 (Lepidoptera, Geometridae), its relatives, and related problems

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Wikispecies has information related to: Eupithecia albibaltea

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Wolry Wolfe

Wolry Wolfe

Personal information

Date of birth
(1981-08-12) 12 August 1981 (age 35)

Place of birth
Bodles, Jamaica

Height
1.71 m (5 ft 7 in)

Playing position
Left winger

Club information

Current team

Humble Lions

Senior career*

Years
Team
Apps
(Gls)

2000–2006
Hazard United
?
(?)

2006
Joe Public
?
(?)

2006–2008
Portmore United
?
(?)

2008–2009
Joe Public
?
(?)

2009
→ Ferencváros (loan)
5
(0)

2009
→ Central Coast Mariners (loan)
0
(0)

2009–2010
Portmore United
?
(?)

2010–2011
Benfica (JAM)
?
(?)

2011–
Humble Lions
30
(7)

National team‡

2007–2009
Jamaica
14
(2)

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 15 January 2011.
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 21 January 2011

Wolry Wolfe (born 12 August 1981) is a Jamaican international footballer who plays professionally for Humble Lions, as a left winger.

Contents

1 Early and personal life
2 Career

2.1 Club career
2.2 International career

3 References

Early and personal life[edit]
Born in Bodles, Wolfe is the brother of Rafe Wolfe and Kemeel Wolfe, and the cousin of Omar Cummings.[1]
Career[edit]
Club career[edit]
Wolfe began his professional career in Jamaica in 2000 with Hazard United, and after a brief spell in Trinidad and Tobago with Joe Public, returned to the renamed Portmore United in 2006. After two seasons, Wolfe returned to Joe Public, spending loan spells in Hungary and Australia with Ferencváros and Central Coast Mariners respectively.[2][3] Wolfe returned to Jamaica in 2009 with Portmore United, moving to Benfica (JAM) in 2010. During the January 2011 transfer window, Wolry Wolfe moved to Humble Lions.[4]
International career[edit]
Wolfe earned 14 caps for Jamaica between 2007 and 2009,[5] including in three FIFA World Cup qualifying matches.[6]
References[edit]

^ “Player profile”. Caribbean Football Database. Retrieved 21 January 2011. 
^ “Player profile” (in Hungarian). Ferencvárosi TC official website. Retrieved 21 January 2011. 
^ “Caribbean Coast Mariners, Irie”. FourFourTwo. 1 September 2009. Retrieved 21 January 2011. 
^ “Wolfe Eats Tivoli Gardens At Effortville!”. Digicel Premier League. Retrieved 15 February 2011. 
^ Wolry Wolfe at National-Football-Teams.com
^ Wolry Wolfe – FIFA competition record

This biographical article relating to Jamaican soccer is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v

Braganza Brooch

Braganza Brooch

Braganza Brooch

Material
Gold

Size
14 cm long

Created
3rd Century BC

Present location
British Museum, London

Registration
2001,0501.1

The Braganza Brooch is a gold ornamental fibula that was made in the third century BC by a Greek craftsman for an Iberian client. Since its discovery in unknown circumstances in the nineteenth century, it has belonged to a variety of owners before being purchased by the British Museum in 2001.[1].

Contents

1 Description
2 Ownership of the Brooch
3 See also
4 Further reading
5 References

Description[edit]
This heavy gold brooch is dominated by the figure of a naked warrior who wears a Celtic helmet and protects himself with a Celtic shield and sword from a hunting dog which jumps up to him. Each end of the fibula is decorated by a dog’s head and it once furnished a spring and pin which is now lost. The form, style and technique suggest that it was made in the third century BC by a Greek jeweller for a Celtic patron who lived on the Iberian Peninsula. Contemporary Iberian brooches were usually made of silver and were often decorated with warriors on horseback accompanied by hunting dogs. In this unique gold version, the craftsman has simplified the hunting scene and added a boar’s head, which once served as the sliding catch for the now missing pin. The brooch measures approximately 14 cm long.
Ownership of the Brooch[edit]
The brooch was once in the collection of the Royal House of Braganza and was perhaps collected by Fernando II, consort of Queen Maria of Portugal. Most of the jewellery of the Braganza dynasty was inherited in 1919 by HRH Nevada of Portugal, Princess d’Braganza and Duchesse d’Oporto who later emigrated to America. On her death in 1941, the collection was sold to Warren Piper of Chicago. The brooch was in turn purchased by Thomas F Flannery Jr in 1950. After being loaned to the British Museum for 7 years, it was purchased by the museum in 2001.
See also[edit]

Cordoba Treasure
Orense Torcs

Further reading[edit]

M. Lenerz-de Wilde, ‘The Celts in Spain’ in The Celtic World (London and New York, Routledge, 1995)
I. Stead, Celtic Art, British Museum Press, 1996
Megaw Ruth and Vincent, Celtic Art: From Its Beginnings to the Book of Kells, 2001

References[edit]

^ British Museum Collection

Andrew Rutherford (politician)

Andrew Rutherford

Member of the New Zealand Parliament
for Hurunui

In office
1902–1908

Preceded by
Seat created

Succeeded by
George Forbes

Personal details

Born
Andrew William Rutherford
9 March 1842
Tumut, New South Wales

Died
11 November 1918
Christchurch, New Zealand

Political party
Liberal

Spouse(s)
Jane Monk (m. 1873)

Children
10

Andrew William Rutherford (9 March 1842 – 11 November 1918) was a Liberal Party Member of Parliament in New Zealand.

Contents

1 Biography

1.1 Early life
1.2 Political career

2 References

Biography[edit]
Early life[edit]
Rutherford was born in 1842 in New South Wales, probably near Tumut, to Scottish parents. He received his education in Brighton, a suburb of Adelaide.[1] He came to New Zealand on 1 January 1860 on the Gundreda with his father and his brother to take up a farm. In 1862, he took charge of another farm, Mendip Hills, on behalf of his father and of Alfred Domett.[2] On 3 November 1873, he married Jane Monk at Waiau. His wife, 15 at the time of their marriage, was to have six sons and four daughters.[1]
Political career[edit]

Parliament of New Zealand

Years
Term
Electorate
Party

1902–1905
15th
Hurunui
Liberal

1905–1908
16th
Hurunui
Liberal

Rutherford represented the Amuri electorate on the Nelson Provincial Council from 1869 to 1871.[3] He won the Hurunui electorate, which replaced the Ashley electorate, in the 1902 general election, defeating Richard Meredith, who had previously represented the Ashley electorate and was also of the Liberal Party.[4] He held the electorate until he retired in 1908.[4]
Rutherford died during the 1918 flu pandemic on 11 November in Christchurch. He was buried at Waiau cemetery. His wife survived him by several decades and died in 1955.[1]
References[edit]

^ a b c Holm, Janet. “Rutherford, Andrew William – Biography”. Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
^ “Mr A. W. Rutherford”. Auckland Star. XXXIII (283). 28 November 1902. p. 3. Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
^ Scholefield, Guy (1950) [First ed. published 1913]. New Zealand Parliamentary Record, 1840–1949 (3rd ed.). Wellington: Govt. Printer. p. 214. 
^ a b Wilson, James Oakley (1985) [First ed. published 1913]. New Zealand Parliamentary Record, 1840–1984 (4th ed.). Wellington: V.R. Ward, Govt. Printer. pp. 219, 232. OCLC 154283103. 

New Zealand Parliament

Ne

2009 US Open – Mixed Doubles

Mixed Doubles

2009 US Open

Champions
Carly Gullickson
Travis Parrott

Runners-up
Cara Black
Leander Paes

Final score
6–2, 6–4

Events

Singles
men
women

boys
girls

Doubles
men
women
mixed
boys
girls

Legends
men
women
mixed

WC Singles
men
women
quad

WC Doubles
men
women
quad

← 2008
US Open
2010 →

Main article: 2009 US Open (tennis)
The United States Open Tennis Championships is a hardcourt tennis tournament held annually at Flushing Meadows, starting on the last Monday in August and lasting for two weeks. The tournament consists of five main championship events: men’s and women’s singles, men’s and women’s doubles, and mixed doubles, with additional tournaments for seniors, juniors, and wheelchair players.
In 2009, the mixed doubles event was won by Carly Gullickson and Travis Parrott, both of the United States, who beat the defending champions Cara Black of Zimbabwe and Leander Paes of India, 6-2, 6-4 in the final.

Contents

1 Seeds
2 Draw

2.1 Key
2.2 Finals
2.3 Top Half
2.4 Bottom Half

3 External links

Seeds[edit]

Liezel Huber / Mahesh Bhupathi (Semifinals)
Cara Black / Leander Paes (Final)
Lisa Raymond / Marcin Matkowski (Quarterfinals)
Anna-Lena Grönefeld / Mark Knowles (Second Round)
Su-Wei Hsieh / Kevin Ullyett (Semifinals)
Nadia Petrova / Max Mirnyi (First Round)
Rennae Stubbs / Robert Lindstedt (Quarterfinals)
Bethanie Mattek-Sands / Nenad Zimonjić (Quarterfinals)

Draw[edit]
Key[edit]

Q = Qualifier
WC = Wild Card
LL = Lucky Loser
Alt = Alternate
SE = Special Exempt
PR = Protected Ranking
w/o = Walkover
r = Retired
d = Defaulted

Finals[edit]

 
Semifinals

Final

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
1
  Liezel Huber
  Mahesh Bhupathi
3
4
 
 

WC
  Carly Gullickson
  Travis Parrott
6
6
 
 

 
WC
  Carly Gullickson
  Travis Parrott
6
6
 

 
2
  Cara Black
  Leander Paes
2
4
 

5
  Hsieh Su-wei
  Kevin Ullyett
2
6
[5]

 
2
  Cara Black
  Leander Paes
6
3
[10]
 

Top Half[edit]

First Round

Second Round

Quarterfinals

Semifinals

1
L Huber
M Bhupathi
7
6
 

 
V King
M Melo
5
0
 

1
L Huber
M Bhupathi
6
6
 

WC
J Craybas
E Butorac
6
69
[10]

WC
J Craybas
E Butorac
3
3
 

Lorenzo Albacete

Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete (January 7, 1941 – October 24, 2014) was a Puerto Rican theologian, Roman Catholic priest, scientist and author. A New York Times Magazine contributor, Albacete was one of the leaders in the United States for the international Catholic movement Communion and Liberation. He was the Chairman of the Board of Advisors of Crossroads Cultural Center.[1]

Contents

1 Biography
2 Publications
3 Bibliography
4 References
5 External links

Biography[edit]
Albacete was born in San Juan, Puerto Rico and was a physicist by training. He held a degree in Space Science and Applied Physics as well as a master’s degree in Sacred Theology from the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. Albacete wrote for Triumph Magazine in Washington, D.C. from 1969 to 1972 and taught theology in El Escorial, Spain from 1970-1972 at The Christian Commonwealth Institute. Albacete was ordained to the priesthood in 1972 for the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Washington. He held a doctorate in Sacred Theology from the Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Rome. He taught at the John Paul II Institute in Washington, D.C., and the St. Joseph Seminary in Yonkers, N.Y., and from 1996 to 1997 served as President of Catholic University of Puerto Rico in Ponce. He was advisor on Hispanic Affairs to the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.
He was a columnist for the Italian weekly Tempi, wrote for The New Yorker, and appeared or was interviewed on CNN, The Charlie Rose Show, PBS, EWTN, Slate, The New Republic, and Godspy, where he was the theological advisor.
In 2010, Monsignor Albacete’s commentary was featured in the award-winning documentary film, The Human Experience.
Monsignor Albacete lived in Yonkers, N.Y. He died on October 23, 2014 in Dobbs Ferry, New York.[1][2]
Publications[edit]
Beside columns and articles on a number of American and international publications, Albacete was the author of God at the Ritz: Attraction to Infinity (Crossroad Publishing Company), a book in which as priest-physicist he talks about science, sex, politics, and religion.
Hendrik Hertzberg (The New Yorker) noted: “Lorenzo Albacete is one of a kind, and so is God at the Ritz. The book, like the monsignor, crackles with humor, warmth, and intellectual excitement. Reading it is like having a stay-up-all-night, jump-out-of-your-chair, have-another-double-espresso marathon conversation with one of the world’s most swashbuckling talkers. Conversation, hell-this is a P

Jeffrey Tessler

This article is an orphan, as no other articles link to it. Please introduce links to this page from related articles; try the Find link tool for suggestions. (January 2012)

Jeffrey Tessler is the Chief executive officer of Clearstream and a member of the Executive Board of Deutsche Börse.[1] He was formerly an Executive Vice President of the Bank of New York.
Education[edit]
He received a MBA from Seton Hall University in New Jersey (1983) and a BA in Political Science from The College of New Jersey in 1975.[2]
References[edit]

^ Clark, Nick (15 December 2004). “Five join Clearstream board as Tessler takes over”. Financial News. Retrieved 2011-12-01. 
^ Jeffrey Tessler: Executive Profile and Biography

This article about a chief executive from the United States is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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1944 Democratic National Convention

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (March 2008) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

1944 Democratic National Convention

1944 presidential election

Nominees
Roosevelt and Truman

Convention

Date(s)
July 19–21, 1944

City
Chicago, Illinois

Venue
Chicago Stadium

Candidates

Presidential nominee
Franklin D. Roosevelt of New York

Vice Presidential nominee
Harry S. Truman of Missouri

Voting

Total delegates
1,176

Votes needed for nomination
589 (majority)

Results (President)
Roosevelt (NY): 1,086 (92.35%)
Byrd (VA): 89 (7.56%)
Farley: 1 (0.09%)

Results (Vice President)
Truman (MO): 1,031 (87.67%)
Wallace (IA): 105 (8.93%)
Cooper (TN): 26 (2.21%)
Barkley (KY): 6 (0.51%)
Others: 7 (0.6%)

‹ 1940  ·  1948 ›

The 1944 Democratic National Convention was held at the Chicago Stadium in Chicago, Illinois from July 19 to July 21, 1944. The convention resulted in the nomination of President Franklin D. Roosevelt for an unprecedented fourth term. Senator Harry S. Truman of Missouri was nominated for Vice President. Including Roosevelt’s nomination for the vice-presidency in 1920, it was the fifth time Roosevelt had been nominated on a national ticket. The keynote address was given by Governor Robert S. Kerr of Oklahoma, in which he “gave tribute to Roosevelt’s war leadership and new deal policies.”[1]

Contents

1 Presidential candidates

1.1 Candidates gallery

2 Balloting
3 The vice-presidential nomination
4 In popular culture
5 References

5.1 Bibliograohy

6 External links

Presidential candidates[edit]
Candidates gallery[edit]

Senator
Harry F. Byrd
of Virginia
(Did not actively run)

Unlike the previous convention, President Roosevelt faced no serious opposition for a fourth term, with the country’s active involvement in World War II and the consequent need for stable leadership considered a more pressing issue than any concerns about his remaining in office. Several Southern delegates who were opposed to Roosevelt’s racial policies tried to draft Virginia senator Harry F. Byrd to run for the Presidential nomination, but Byrd decided against actively campaigning against the President. In the end, Byrd did win more delegates than any of the candidates who had tried to run against Roosevelt four years prior, but this still fell far sho

James Hamilton (British Army officer, born 1777)

For other people named James Hamilton, see James Hamilton (disambiguation).

James Inglis Hamilton

Birth name
Jamie Anderson

Born
(1777-07-04)4 July 1777
Tayantroga

Died
18 June 1815(1815-06-18) (aged 37)
Waterloo, Belgium

Allegiance
 Great Britain

Service/branch
British Army

Years of service
1792–1815

Rank
Lieutenant colonel

Battles/wars

War of the Seventh Coalition

Battle of Waterloo

Relations

James Inglis Hamilton (adopted father)

Lieutenant colonel James Inglis Hamilton (born Jamie Anderson, 4 July 1777 – 18 June 1815) was a Colonel in the British Army killed at the Battle of Waterloo.

Contents

1 Early life
2 Military career

2.1 Battle of Waterloo

3 Personal life
4 Notes
5 References

Early life[edit]
He was born as Jamie Anderson on 4 July 1777 at a camp of the Saratoga Campaign in New York. He was the second son of William Anderson, a Sergeant-Major of the 21st Foot.[1] Hamilton was baptized on 28 August 1777.[2] General James Inglis Hamilton adopted him following the Battle of Bemis Heights, and funded his education at Glasgow Grammar School.[1]
Military career[edit]
Hamilton’s adopted father opened a spot in the British Army and Hamilton became a cornet in the Royal Scots Greys in 1792.[2] This is when he changed his name to James Hamilton.[2] Hamilton was promoted to lieutenant on 4 October 1793.[2] On 15 April 1794, he was promoted to captain.[2] Hamilton became major on 17 February 1803.[2] He was promoted to lieutenant colonel on 16 June 1807,[2] and he commanded the Royal Scots Greys.[1] On 4 June 1814, Hamilton was promoted to Colonel.[3]
Battle of Waterloo[edit]

The Royal Scots Greys at the Battle of Waterloo, depicted by Elizabeth Thompson.

By the time of the Battle of Waterloo he was a Lt. Colonel, commanding the Royal Scots Greys. While leading a charge on horseback, he lost his left arm. He put the reins in his mouth and continued the charge, even after his right arm was severed by a French lancer. Moments later he was shot and killed. He was found with a bullet wound through his heart, as well as other injuries; Hamilton’s scabbard and silken sash were sent to his brother,[1] Lieutenant Jno. Anderson, who died in Glasgow on 3 December 1816 from wounds received at the Battle of Salamanca.[2]
Personal life[edit]
Hamilton married Mary Inglis Payne.[4] Upon Hamilton’s death, Payne was compensated £200.[2]
He inherited Murdostoun Castle from his fat

Nicolas Muzin

Nicolas “Nick” David Muzin is a Canadian-born Republican political strategist, attorney and physician. He serves as the director of coalitions for the United States House Republican Conference[1] and is currently senior adviser and deputy chief of staff for strategy for current Republican candidate for President of the United States Sen. Ted Cruz.[2]

Contents

1 Early life
2 Education
3 Career
4 Personal life
5 References

Early life[edit]
Muzin is originally from Toronto, Ontario, and is the son of Helen and Gary Muzin. His father is the president of a construction distribution and supply company.[3]
Education[edit]
Muzin attended Ner Israel Yeshiva High School in Toronto. After spending some post-high school time at the Talmudical Yeshiva of Philadelphia, he attended Yeshiva University in the Washington Heights section of Manhattan. While there, he served as editor in chief of the school newspaper, The Commentator, graduating in 1997. Muzin then completed Albert Einstein College of Medicine on a full four-year scholarship in 2001. Following a year as an internal medicine intern, Muzin proceeded to Yale Law School.[4] At Yale, Nicolas was a member of the Jewish leadership society Shabtai.
Career[edit]
In 2000, Muzin found himself supporting the Al Gore / Joe Lieberman ticket, but found himself gravitating towards the conservative side of the aisle while in Yale. He joined George W. Bush’s 2004 reelection campaign as counsel for the Republican National Committee and served as a medical adviser for the 2008 presidential campaign of Sen. John McCain.[5] From 2005 to 2008, Muzin was of council at Williams & Connolly.
Muzin was policy adviser for then Charleston City Councilmember Tim Scott during his successful 2010 campaign for US Congress following the retirement of Rep. Henry Brown, and until December of that year, served as Scott’s chief of staff. Muzin remained involved with Scott during his transition from the House to his current position in the Senate.[5]
Recruited by Chad Sweet, national campaign chairman for Sen. Ted Cruz,[6] Muzin is currently senior advisor and deputy chief of staff for strategy for Cruz’s Republican candidacy for President of the United States in the 2016 election.[1] Cruz has stated publicly that he uses Muzin as a sounding board on issues related to Judaism and to gain a deeper understanding of the religion and the broader community.[7]
Muzin is also the national political director for the Washington D.C. political