Monton Mill, Eccles

Monton

Location within Greater Manchester

Cotton

Spinning (ring mill)

Location
Eccles

Serving canal
Bridgewater Canal

Serving railway
Liverpool and Manchester Railway

Owner
Monton Mill Co

Further ownership

Lancashire Cotton Corporation (1930s)
Courtaulds (1964)

Coordinates
53°29′27″N 2°21′31″W / 53.4907°N 2.3587°W / 53.4907; -2.3587

Construction

Built
1906

Power

Date
1906

Engine maker
George Saxon & Co

Engine type
inverted vertical cross compound engine

Valve Gear
Corliss valves

rpm
75rpm

Flywheel diameter
22ft

Boiler configuration

Running temperature
160psi

Equipment

Manufacturer
Platt Brothers and Co

References

[1]

Monton Mill was a cotton spinning mill in Eccles, Greater Manchester, England, built in 1906. It was taken over by the Lancashire Cotton Corporation in the 1930s and passed to Courtaulds in 1964. Production finished, it was demolished but its name is preserved in the street name.

Contents

1 Location
2 History
3 Architecture

3.1 Power
3.2 Equipment

4 Usage

4.1 Owners

5 See also
6 References

6.1 Notes

7 Bibliography
8 External links

Location[edit]
Eccles (pop. 36,600) is a town in the City of Salford, a metropolitan borough of Greater Manchester in North West England, 2.7 miles (4.3 km) west of Salford and 3.7 miles (6.0 km) west of Manchester city centre.[2] Historically a part of Lancashire, Eccles lies on sloping ground between the M602 motorway (to the north), and the Manchester Ship Canal (to the south). The town is served by the Bridgewater Canal and the Liverpool and Manchester Railway.
Monton Mill was situated on the west bank the Bridgewater Canal, 1.0 mile (1.6 km) north of the railway line.
History[edit]
The parish of Eccles contained the townships of Barton-upon-Irwell, Clifton, Pendlebury, Pendleton, and Worsley.[3] Toward the end of the Middle Ages the parish had an estimated population of about 4,000 Communicants. Agriculture remained an important local industry, with little change from the medieval system due to a lack of adequate drainage and fertiliser.[4] Local cottage industries included blacksmiths, butchers, thatching, basket weaving, skinning, and tanning. Weaving was popular, using linen and wool. Merchants traded in corn, and badgers bought and sold local produce.[5]
During the 18th century the predominance of textiles in the region is partly demonstrated in the parish registers of 1807, w
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