Braganza Brooch

Braganza Brooch

Braganza Brooch

Material
Gold

Size
14 cm long

Created
3rd Century BC

Present location
British Museum, London

Registration
2001,0501.1

The Braganza Brooch is a gold ornamental fibula that was made in the third century BC by a Greek craftsman for an Iberian client. Since its discovery in unknown circumstances in the nineteenth century, it has belonged to a variety of owners before being purchased by the British Museum in 2001.[1].

Contents

1 Description
2 Ownership of the Brooch
3 See also
4 Further reading
5 References

Description[edit]
This heavy gold brooch is dominated by the figure of a naked warrior who wears a Celtic helmet and protects himself with a Celtic shield and sword from a hunting dog which jumps up to him. Each end of the fibula is decorated by a dog’s head and it once furnished a spring and pin which is now lost. The form, style and technique suggest that it was made in the third century BC by a Greek jeweller for a Celtic patron who lived on the Iberian Peninsula. Contemporary Iberian brooches were usually made of silver and were often decorated with warriors on horseback accompanied by hunting dogs. In this unique gold version, the craftsman has simplified the hunting scene and added a boar’s head, which once served as the sliding catch for the now missing pin. The brooch measures approximately 14 cm long.
Ownership of the Brooch[edit]
The brooch was once in the collection of the Royal House of Braganza and was perhaps collected by Fernando II, consort of Queen Maria of Portugal. Most of the jewellery of the Braganza dynasty was inherited in 1919 by HRH Nevada of Portugal, Princess d’Braganza and Duchesse d’Oporto who later emigrated to America. On her death in 1941, the collection was sold to Warren Piper of Chicago. The brooch was in turn purchased by Thomas F Flannery Jr in 1950. After being loaned to the British Museum for 7 years, it was purchased by the museum in 2001.
See also[edit]

Cordoba Treasure
Orense Torcs

Further reading[edit]

M. Lenerz-de Wilde, ‘The Celts in Spain’ in The Celtic World (London and New York, Routledge, 1995)
I. Stead, Celtic Art, British Museum Press, 1996
Megaw Ruth and Vincent, Celtic Art: From Its Beginnings to the Book of Kells, 2001

References[edit]

^ British Museum Collection

Andrew Rutherford (politician)

Andrew Rutherford

Member of the New Zealand Parliament
for Hurunui

In office
1902–1908

Preceded by
Seat created

Succeeded by
George Forbes

Personal details

Born
Andrew William Rutherford
9 March 1842
Tumut, New South Wales

Died
11 November 1918
Christchurch, New Zealand

Political party
Liberal

Spouse(s)
Jane Monk (m. 1873)

Children
10

Andrew William Rutherford (9 March 1842 – 11 November 1918) was a Liberal Party Member of Parliament in New Zealand.

Contents

1 Biography

1.1 Early life
1.2 Political career

2 References

Biography[edit]
Early life[edit]
Rutherford was born in 1842 in New South Wales, probably near Tumut, to Scottish parents. He received his education in Brighton, a suburb of Adelaide.[1] He came to New Zealand on 1 January 1860 on the Gundreda with his father and his brother to take up a farm. In 1862, he took charge of another farm, Mendip Hills, on behalf of his father and of Alfred Domett.[2] On 3 November 1873, he married Jane Monk at Waiau. His wife, 15 at the time of their marriage, was to have six sons and four daughters.[1]
Political career[edit]

Parliament of New Zealand

Years
Term
Electorate
Party

1902–1905
15th
Hurunui
Liberal

1905–1908
16th
Hurunui
Liberal

Rutherford represented the Amuri electorate on the Nelson Provincial Council from 1869 to 1871.[3] He won the Hurunui electorate, which replaced the Ashley electorate, in the 1902 general election, defeating Richard Meredith, who had previously represented the Ashley electorate and was also of the Liberal Party.[4] He held the electorate until he retired in 1908.[4]
Rutherford died during the 1918 flu pandemic on 11 November in Christchurch. He was buried at Waiau cemetery. His wife survived him by several decades and died in 1955.[1]
References[edit]

^ a b c Holm, Janet. “Rutherford, Andrew William – Biography”. Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
^ “Mr A. W. Rutherford”. Auckland Star. XXXIII (283). 28 November 1902. p. 3. Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
^ Scholefield, Guy (1950) [First ed. published 1913]. New Zealand Parliamentary Record, 1840–1949 (3rd ed.). Wellington: Govt. Printer. p. 214. 
^ a b Wilson, James Oakley (1985) [First ed. published 1913]. New Zealand Parliamentary Record, 1840–1984 (4th ed.). Wellington: V.R. Ward, Govt. Printer. pp. 219, 232. OCLC 154283103. 

New Zealand Parliament

Ne

James Hamilton (British Army officer, born 1777)

For other people named James Hamilton, see James Hamilton (disambiguation).

James Inglis Hamilton

Birth name
Jamie Anderson

Born
(1777-07-04)4 July 1777
Tayantroga

Died
18 June 1815(1815-06-18) (aged 37)
Waterloo, Belgium

Allegiance
 Great Britain

Service/branch
British Army

Years of service
1792–1815

Rank
Lieutenant colonel

Battles/wars

War of the Seventh Coalition

Battle of Waterloo

Relations

James Inglis Hamilton (adopted father)

Lieutenant colonel James Inglis Hamilton (born Jamie Anderson, 4 July 1777 – 18 June 1815) was a Colonel in the British Army killed at the Battle of Waterloo.

Contents

1 Early life
2 Military career

2.1 Battle of Waterloo

3 Personal life
4 Notes
5 References

Early life[edit]
He was born as Jamie Anderson on 4 July 1777 at a camp of the Saratoga Campaign in New York. He was the second son of William Anderson, a Sergeant-Major of the 21st Foot.[1] Hamilton was baptized on 28 August 1777.[2] General James Inglis Hamilton adopted him following the Battle of Bemis Heights, and funded his education at Glasgow Grammar School.[1]
Military career[edit]
Hamilton’s adopted father opened a spot in the British Army and Hamilton became a cornet in the Royal Scots Greys in 1792.[2] This is when he changed his name to James Hamilton.[2] Hamilton was promoted to lieutenant on 4 October 1793.[2] On 15 April 1794, he was promoted to captain.[2] Hamilton became major on 17 February 1803.[2] He was promoted to lieutenant colonel on 16 June 1807,[2] and he commanded the Royal Scots Greys.[1] On 4 June 1814, Hamilton was promoted to Colonel.[3]
Battle of Waterloo[edit]

The Royal Scots Greys at the Battle of Waterloo, depicted by Elizabeth Thompson.

By the time of the Battle of Waterloo he was a Lt. Colonel, commanding the Royal Scots Greys. While leading a charge on horseback, he lost his left arm. He put the reins in his mouth and continued the charge, even after his right arm was severed by a French lancer. Moments later he was shot and killed. He was found with a bullet wound through his heart, as well as other injuries; Hamilton’s scabbard and silken sash were sent to his brother,[1] Lieutenant Jno. Anderson, who died in Glasgow on 3 December 1816 from wounds received at the Battle of Salamanca.[2]
Personal life[edit]
Hamilton married Mary Inglis Payne.[4] Upon Hamilton’s death, Payne was compensated £200.[2]
He inherited Murdostoun Castle from his fat

Nicolas Muzin

Nicolas “Nick” David Muzin is a Canadian-born Republican political strategist, attorney and physician. He serves as the director of coalitions for the United States House Republican Conference[1] and is currently senior adviser and deputy chief of staff for strategy for current Republican candidate for President of the United States Sen. Ted Cruz.[2]

Contents

1 Early life
2 Education
3 Career
4 Personal life
5 References

Early life[edit]
Muzin is originally from Toronto, Ontario, and is the son of Helen and Gary Muzin. His father is the president of a construction distribution and supply company.[3]
Education[edit]
Muzin attended Ner Israel Yeshiva High School in Toronto. After spending some post-high school time at the Talmudical Yeshiva of Philadelphia, he attended Yeshiva University in the Washington Heights section of Manhattan. While there, he served as editor in chief of the school newspaper, The Commentator, graduating in 1997. Muzin then completed Albert Einstein College of Medicine on a full four-year scholarship in 2001. Following a year as an internal medicine intern, Muzin proceeded to Yale Law School.[4] At Yale, Nicolas was a member of the Jewish leadership society Shabtai.
Career[edit]
In 2000, Muzin found himself supporting the Al Gore / Joe Lieberman ticket, but found himself gravitating towards the conservative side of the aisle while in Yale. He joined George W. Bush’s 2004 reelection campaign as counsel for the Republican National Committee and served as a medical adviser for the 2008 presidential campaign of Sen. John McCain.[5] From 2005 to 2008, Muzin was of council at Williams & Connolly.
Muzin was policy adviser for then Charleston City Councilmember Tim Scott during his successful 2010 campaign for US Congress following the retirement of Rep. Henry Brown, and until December of that year, served as Scott’s chief of staff. Muzin remained involved with Scott during his transition from the House to his current position in the Senate.[5]
Recruited by Chad Sweet, national campaign chairman for Sen. Ted Cruz,[6] Muzin is currently senior advisor and deputy chief of staff for strategy for Cruz’s Republican candidacy for President of the United States in the 2016 election.[1] Cruz has stated publicly that he uses Muzin as a sounding board on issues related to Judaism and to gain a deeper understanding of the religion and the broader community.[7]
Muzin is also the national political director for the Washington D.C. political

Hungary at the Paralympics

Hungary at the
Paralympics

IPC code
HUN

NPC
Hungarian Paralympic Committee

Website
www.hparalimpia.hu

Medals

Gold
Silver
Bronze
Total

0
0
0
0

Summer appearances

1972
1976–1980
1984
1988
1992
1996
2000
2004
2008
2012
2016

Winter appearances

2002
2006
2010
2014

Hungary made its Paralympic Games début at the 1972 Summer Paralympics in Heidelberg, with a delegation of four athletes in track and field. The country was then absent in 1976 and 1980, making a permanent return to the Paralympics in 1984. Hungary first took part in the Winter Paralympics in 2002, and continuously attended the Winter Games through 2010. Hungary was absent from the 2014 Winter Games.[1]
Hungarians have won a total of 107 Paralympic medals (27 gold, 34 silver, 46 bronze), placing the country 32nd on the all-time Paralympic Games medal table. All of these medals have been won at the Summer Games.[2]
Arguably Hungary’s most successful Paralympian is Attila Jeszenszky, who won four gold medals in swimming at the 1984 Summer Games.[2] Hungary also boasts the only athlete in the world to have won medals at both the Paralympics and the Olympics. Fencer Pál Szekeres won a bronze medal at the 1988 Summer Olympics, before being disabled in a bus accident and beginning a Paralympic career in wheelchair fencing, which brought him six Paralympic medals – of which three gold.[3][4][5]

Contents

1 Medal tallies

1.1 Summer Paralympics
1.2 Winter Paralympics

2 See also
3 References

Medal tallies[edit]
Summer Paralympics[edit]

Event
Gold
Silver
Bronze
Total
Ranking

1972 Summer Paralympics
0
0
1
1
30th

1984 Summer Paralympics
12
12
4
28
18th

1988 Summer Paralympics
0
4
8
12
40th

1992 Summer Paralympics
4
3
4
11
25th

1996 Summer Paralympics
5
2
3
10
29th

2000 Summer Paralympics
4
5
14
23
32nd

2004 Summer Paralympics
1
8
10
19
46th

2008 Summer Paralympics
1
0
5
6
49th

2012 Summer Paralympics
2
6
6
14
38th

2016 Summer Paralympics
1
8
9
18
47th

Winter Paralympics[edit]

Event
Gold
Silver
Bronze
Total
Ranking

2002 Winter Paralympics
0
0
0
0

2006 Winter Paralympics
0
0
0
0

2010 Winter Paralympics
0
0
0
0

See also[edit]

Hungary at the Olympics

References[edit]

^ Hungary at the Paralympics, International Paralympic Committee
^ a b Hungary at the Paralympics, International Paralympic Committee
^ “Pal Szekeres : médaillé olympique et paralympique !”, Radio Canada, September 23, 2004
^ “Hungarian Paralym
일본야동

National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) is a branch of the U.S. National Institutes of Health. The institute aims to improve the oral, dental, and craniofacial health through research and the distribution of important health information to the American people.

Contents

1 History
2 NIDCR Directors [1]
3 Notes and references
4 External links

History[edit]
In 1931, the United States Public Health Service established a Dental Hygiene Unit at the National Institutes of Health. Designated as the first dental research worker, Dr. H. Trendley Dean studied the communities affected by the oral disease known as mottled enamel. Following the implementation of a water fluoridation trial in Grand Rapids, Michigan, the National Institute of Dental Research (NIDR), was established by President Harry S. Truman on June 24, 1948. The first grants and fellowships that supported dental research were awarded the following year.
In an effort to expand the NIDR, plans to finance the construction of a building for the institute were approved by President Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1958. The National Institute of Dental Research also established the Laboratory of Biochemistry to further the research regarding the structure and functions of various proteins. In continuing with this expansion, a grant to develop several dental research facilities at various universities was approved in 1967. This program hoped to establish research and training environments, as well as promote interdisciplinary approaches to combating oral diseases.
In addition to the Laboratory of Biochemistry, other laboratories were established in the years 1974 and 1975. These newly established laboratories focused on the field of oral medicine as well as the fields of microbiology and immunology. Another effort to expand research was implemented a decade later. The Dentist Scientist Award Program aimed to provide dentists with opportunities and incentive to pursue independent research regarding oral health.
In 1986, the most extensive survey on the dental health of American adults was completed by the NIDR. This study was the first to examine oral health diseases on a large and detailed scale. Following this survey, in 1993, the National Oral Health Information Clearinghouse was established. The purpose of this database is to provide resources for health professionals, patients, and the general public regarding oral health. In continuing with its mission to distribute important h
인천오피