Wolry Wolfe

Wolry Wolfe

Personal information

Date of birth
(1981-08-12) 12 August 1981 (age 35)

Place of birth
Bodles, Jamaica

Height
1.71 m (5 ft 7 in)

Playing position
Left winger

Club information

Current team

Humble Lions

Senior career*

Years
Team
Apps
(Gls)

2000–2006
Hazard United
?
(?)

2006
Joe Public
?
(?)

2006–2008
Portmore United
?
(?)

2008–2009
Joe Public
?
(?)

2009
→ Ferencváros (loan)
5
(0)

2009
→ Central Coast Mariners (loan)
0
(0)

2009–2010
Portmore United
?
(?)

2010–2011
Benfica (JAM)
?
(?)

2011–
Humble Lions
30
(7)

National team‡

2007–2009
Jamaica
14
(2)

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 15 January 2011.
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 21 January 2011

Wolry Wolfe (born 12 August 1981) is a Jamaican international footballer who plays professionally for Humble Lions, as a left winger.

Contents

1 Early and personal life
2 Career

2.1 Club career
2.2 International career

3 References

Early and personal life[edit]
Born in Bodles, Wolfe is the brother of Rafe Wolfe and Kemeel Wolfe, and the cousin of Omar Cummings.[1]
Career[edit]
Club career[edit]
Wolfe began his professional career in Jamaica in 2000 with Hazard United, and after a brief spell in Trinidad and Tobago with Joe Public, returned to the renamed Portmore United in 2006. After two seasons, Wolfe returned to Joe Public, spending loan spells in Hungary and Australia with Ferencváros and Central Coast Mariners respectively.[2][3] Wolfe returned to Jamaica in 2009 with Portmore United, moving to Benfica (JAM) in 2010. During the January 2011 transfer window, Wolry Wolfe moved to Humble Lions.[4]
International career[edit]
Wolfe earned 14 caps for Jamaica between 2007 and 2009,[5] including in three FIFA World Cup qualifying matches.[6]
References[edit]

^ “Player profile”. Caribbean Football Database. Retrieved 21 January 2011. 
^ “Player profile” (in Hungarian). Ferencvárosi TC official website. Retrieved 21 January 2011. 
^ “Caribbean Coast Mariners, Irie”. FourFourTwo. 1 September 2009. Retrieved 21 January 2011. 
^ “Wolfe Eats Tivoli Gardens At Effortville!”. Digicel Premier League. Retrieved 15 February 2011. 
^ Wolry Wolfe at National-Football-Teams.com
^ Wolry Wolfe – FIFA competition record

This biographical article relating to Jamaican soccer is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v

Lorenzo Albacete

Monsignor Lorenzo Albacete (January 7, 1941 – October 24, 2014) was a Puerto Rican theologian, Roman Catholic priest, scientist and author. A New York Times Magazine contributor, Albacete was one of the leaders in the United States for the international Catholic movement Communion and Liberation. He was the Chairman of the Board of Advisors of Crossroads Cultural Center.[1]

Contents

1 Biography
2 Publications
3 Bibliography
4 References
5 External links

Biography[edit]
Albacete was born in San Juan, Puerto Rico and was a physicist by training. He held a degree in Space Science and Applied Physics as well as a master’s degree in Sacred Theology from the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. Albacete wrote for Triumph Magazine in Washington, D.C. from 1969 to 1972 and taught theology in El Escorial, Spain from 1970-1972 at The Christian Commonwealth Institute. Albacete was ordained to the priesthood in 1972 for the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Washington. He held a doctorate in Sacred Theology from the Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Rome. He taught at the John Paul II Institute in Washington, D.C., and the St. Joseph Seminary in Yonkers, N.Y., and from 1996 to 1997 served as President of Catholic University of Puerto Rico in Ponce. He was advisor on Hispanic Affairs to the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.
He was a columnist for the Italian weekly Tempi, wrote for The New Yorker, and appeared or was interviewed on CNN, The Charlie Rose Show, PBS, EWTN, Slate, The New Republic, and Godspy, where he was the theological advisor.
In 2010, Monsignor Albacete’s commentary was featured in the award-winning documentary film, The Human Experience.
Monsignor Albacete lived in Yonkers, N.Y. He died on October 23, 2014 in Dobbs Ferry, New York.[1][2]
Publications[edit]
Beside columns and articles on a number of American and international publications, Albacete was the author of God at the Ritz: Attraction to Infinity (Crossroad Publishing Company), a book in which as priest-physicist he talks about science, sex, politics, and religion.
Hendrik Hertzberg (The New Yorker) noted: “Lorenzo Albacete is one of a kind, and so is God at the Ritz. The book, like the monsignor, crackles with humor, warmth, and intellectual excitement. Reading it is like having a stay-up-all-night, jump-out-of-your-chair, have-another-double-espresso marathon conversation with one of the world’s most swashbuckling talkers. Conversation, hell-this is a P

Qobadlu

Qobadlu
قبادلو

village

Qobadlu

Coordinates: 37°32′50″N 45°45′18″E / 37.54722°N 45.75500°E / 37.54722; 45.75500Coordinates: 37°32′50″N 45°45′18″E / 37.54722°N 45.75500°E / 37.54722; 45.75500

Country
 Iran

Province
East Azerbaijan

County
Ajab Shir

Bakhsh
Central

Rural District
Dizajrud-e Gharbi

Population (2006)

 • Total
330

Time zone
IRST (UTC+3:30)

 • Summer (DST)
IRDT (UTC+4:30)

Qobadlu (Persian: قبادلو‎‎, also Romanized as Qobādlū)[1] is a village in Dizajrud-e Gharbi Rural District, in the Central District of Ajab Shir County, East Azerbaijan Province, Iran. At the 2006 census, its population was 330, in 76 families.[2]
References[edit]

^ Qobadlu can be found at GEOnet Names Server, at this link, by opening the Advanced Search box, entering “-3813517” in the “Unique Feature Id” form, and clicking on “Search Database”.
^ “Census of the Islamic Republic of Iran, 1385 (2006)”. Islamic Republic of Iran. Archived from the original (Excel) on 2011-11-11. 

v
t
e

Ajab Shir County

Capital

Ajab Shir

Districts

Central

Cities

Ajab Shir
Khezerlu

Rural Districts
and villages

Dizajrud-e Gharbi
(West Dizajrud)

Ajab Shir 03 Garrison
Aqcheh Owbeh
Bulalu
Chupankareh
Danalu
Gol Tappeh
Gowravan
Heravan
Khanian
Mehrabad
Nebrin
Qobadlu
Rahmanlu
Shishavan

Khezerlu

Nanesa
Posyan
Razian
Shiraz

Qaleh Chay

Cities

none

Rural Districts
and villages

Dizajrud-e Sharqi
(East Dizajrud)

Aghajari
Alin Jaq
Bukat
Chenar
Dizaj-e Hasan Beyg
Gonbad
Huri
Javan Qaleh
Mahmudabad
Mehmandar
Sowmaeh
Tajaraq
Tapik Darreh
Valin Jeq
Zaviyeh

Kuhestan

Almalu
Barazlu
Chahar Barud
Chahar Taq
Hargalan
Quzlujeh
Yaychi
Yengejeh

This Ajab Shir County location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v
t
e

William Milligan

For other people named William Milligan, see William Milligan (disambiguation).

William Milligan

Born
(1821-03-21)21 March 1821
Edinburgh

Died
11 December 1893(1893-12-11) (aged 72)
Edinburgh

Nationality
Scottish

Occupation
Theologian

William Milligan (15 March 1821 – 11 December 1893) was a renowned Scottish theologian. He studied at the University of Halle in Germany, and eventually became a professor at the University of Aberdeen. He is best known for his commentary on the Revelation of St. John. He also wrote two other well-known books that are classics: The Resurrection of our Lord and The Ascension of our Lord.

Contents

1 Life
2 Works
3 Family
4 References
5 External links

Life[edit]
He was born at Edinburgh on 15 March 1821, the eldest of seven children of the Rev. George Milligan and his wife, Janet Fraser. His father, a licentiate of the church of Scotland, was then engaged in teaching at Edinburgh, and Milligan was sent to the high school, where he was dux of his class. In 1832, when his father became minister of the Fifeshire parish of Elie, he was transferred to the neighbouring parish school of Kilconquhar, and thence proceeded in 1835 to the university of St. Andrews. Though only fourteen years of age, he earned from that day, by private teaching, as much as paid his class-fees, much to his parents’ relief, for Elie was a ‘small living.’ Graduating M.A. in 1839, and devoting himself to the ministry, he took his divinity course partly at St. Andrews and partly at Edinburgh, and for a time he was tutor to the sons of Sir George Suttie of Prestongrange. [1]
During the disruption controversy of 1843, Milligan adhered to the church of Scotland. He wrote to his father that he was resolved to “remain in … and lend any aid he could to those who are ready to unite in building up, on principles agreeable to the word of God, the old church of Scotland.” He was at this time assistant to Robert Swan, minister at Abercrombie ; next year he was presented to the Fifeshire parish of Cameron and ordained.[1]
In 1845, his health gave cause for anxiety, and he obtained a leave of absence for a year, which he spent in Germany, studying at Halle. He made the acquaintance, among others, of August Neander, in whom he found a kindred spirit. Promoted in 1850 to the more important parish of Kilconquhar, and in 1860 he was appointed first professor of biblical criticism in the university of Aberdeen. He worked hard ; but h
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Takashi Tanihata

Takashi Tanihata (谷畑 孝, Tanihata Takashi?, born January 10, 1947) is a Japanese politician serving in the House of Representatives in the Diet (national legislature) as a member of the Initiatives from Osaka party. A native of Osaka Prefecture and graduate of Kansai University he was elected for the first time in 1989 after an unsuccessful run in 1986.
References[edit]

政治家情報 〜谷畑 孝〜. ザ・選挙 (in Japanese). JANJAN. Retrieved 2007-10-02. 

External links[edit]

Official website in Japanese.

Authority control

WorldCat Identities
VIAF: 254137204
NDL: 00398387

This article about a Japanese politician born in the 1940s is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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e

일본야동

Ring (chemistry)

Four cycloalkanes, all of which exhibit simple rings

In chemistry, a ring is an ambiguous term referring either to a simple cycle of atoms and bonds in a molecule or to a connected set of atoms and bonds in which every atom and bond is a member of a cycle (also called a ring system). A ring system that is a simple cycle is called a monocycle or simple ring, and one that is not a simple cycle is called a polycycle or polycyclic ring system. A simple ring contains the same number of sigma bonds as atoms, and a polycyclic ring system contains more sigma bonds than atoms.
A molecule containing one or more rings is called a cyclic compound, and a molecule containing two or more rings (either in the same or different ring systems) is termed a polycyclic compound. A molecule containing no rings is called an acyclic or open-chain compound.

Contents

1 Homocyclic and heterocyclic rings
2 Rings and ring systems
3 See also
4 References

Homocyclic and heterocyclic rings[edit]
A homocycle or homocyclic ring is a ring in which all atoms are of the same chemical element.[1] A heterocycle or heterocyclic ring is a ring containing atoms of at least two different elements, i.e. a non-homocyclic ring.[2] A carbocycle or carbocyclic ring is a homocyclic ring in which all of the atoms are carbon.[3] An important class of carbocycles are alicyclic rings,[4] and an important subclass of these are cycloalkanes.
Rings and ring systems[edit]
In common usage the terms “ring” and “ring system” are frequently interchanged, with the appropriate definition depending upon context. Typically a “ring” denotes a simple ring, unless otherwise qualified, as in terms like “polycyclic ring”, “fused ring”, “spiro ring” and “indole ring”, where clearly a polycyclic ring system is intended. Likewise, a “ring system” typically denotes a polycyclic ring system, except in terms like “monocyclic ring system” or “pyridine ring system”. To reduce ambiguity, IUPAC’s recommendations on organic nomenclature avoid the use of the term “ring” by using phrases such as “monocyclic parent” and “polycyclic ring system”.[5]
See also[edit]

Cyclic compound
Polycyclic compound
Heterocyclic compound
Bicyclic molecule
Spiro compound

References[edit]

^ IUPAC, Compendium of Chemical Terminology, 2nd ed. (the “Gold Book”) (1997). Online corrected version:  (1995) “Homocyclic compounds”.
^ IUPAC, Compendium of Chemical Terminology, 2nd ed. (the “Gold Book”) (1997). Online corrected version:  (1995
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