2009 US Open – Mixed Doubles

Mixed Doubles

2009 US Open

Champions
Carly Gullickson
Travis Parrott

Runners-up
Cara Black
Leander Paes

Final score
6–2, 6–4

Events

Singles
men
women

boys
girls

Doubles
men
women
mixed
boys
girls

Legends
men
women
mixed

WC Singles
men
women
quad

WC Doubles
men
women
quad

← 2008
US Open
2010 →

Main article: 2009 US Open (tennis)
The United States Open Tennis Championships is a hardcourt tennis tournament held annually at Flushing Meadows, starting on the last Monday in August and lasting for two weeks. The tournament consists of five main championship events: men’s and women’s singles, men’s and women’s doubles, and mixed doubles, with additional tournaments for seniors, juniors, and wheelchair players.
In 2009, the mixed doubles event was won by Carly Gullickson and Travis Parrott, both of the United States, who beat the defending champions Cara Black of Zimbabwe and Leander Paes of India, 6-2, 6-4 in the final.

Contents

1 Seeds
2 Draw

2.1 Key
2.2 Finals
2.3 Top Half
2.4 Bottom Half

3 External links

Seeds[edit]

Liezel Huber / Mahesh Bhupathi (Semifinals)
Cara Black / Leander Paes (Final)
Lisa Raymond / Marcin Matkowski (Quarterfinals)
Anna-Lena Grönefeld / Mark Knowles (Second Round)
Su-Wei Hsieh / Kevin Ullyett (Semifinals)
Nadia Petrova / Max Mirnyi (First Round)
Rennae Stubbs / Robert Lindstedt (Quarterfinals)
Bethanie Mattek-Sands / Nenad Zimonjić (Quarterfinals)

Draw[edit]
Key[edit]

Q = Qualifier
WC = Wild Card
LL = Lucky Loser
Alt = Alternate
SE = Special Exempt
PR = Protected Ranking
w/o = Walkover
r = Retired
d = Defaulted

Finals[edit]

 
Semifinals

Final

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
1
  Liezel Huber
  Mahesh Bhupathi
3
4
 
 

WC
  Carly Gullickson
  Travis Parrott
6
6
 
 

 
WC
  Carly Gullickson
  Travis Parrott
6
6
 

 
2
  Cara Black
  Leander Paes
2
4
 

5
  Hsieh Su-wei
  Kevin Ullyett
2
6
[5]

 
2
  Cara Black
  Leander Paes
6
3
[10]
 

Top Half[edit]

First Round

Second Round

Quarterfinals

Semifinals

1
L Huber
M Bhupathi
7
6
 

 
V King
M Melo
5
0
 

1
L Huber
M Bhupathi
6
6
 

WC
J Craybas
E Butorac
6
69
[10]

WC
J Craybas
E Butorac
3
3
 

Jeffrey Tessler

This article is an orphan, as no other articles link to it. Please introduce links to this page from related articles; try the Find link tool for suggestions. (January 2012)

Jeffrey Tessler is the Chief executive officer of Clearstream and a member of the Executive Board of Deutsche Börse.[1] He was formerly an Executive Vice President of the Bank of New York.
Education[edit]
He received a MBA from Seton Hall University in New Jersey (1983) and a BA in Political Science from The College of New Jersey in 1975.[2]
References[edit]

^ Clark, Nick (15 December 2004). “Five join Clearstream board as Tessler takes over”. Financial News. Retrieved 2011-12-01. 
^ Jeffrey Tessler: Executive Profile and Biography

This article about a chief executive from the United States is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v
t
e

1944 Democratic National Convention

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (March 2008) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

1944 Democratic National Convention

1944 presidential election

Nominees
Roosevelt and Truman

Convention

Date(s)
July 19–21, 1944

City
Chicago, Illinois

Venue
Chicago Stadium

Candidates

Presidential nominee
Franklin D. Roosevelt of New York

Vice Presidential nominee
Harry S. Truman of Missouri

Voting

Total delegates
1,176

Votes needed for nomination
589 (majority)

Results (President)
Roosevelt (NY): 1,086 (92.35%)
Byrd (VA): 89 (7.56%)
Farley: 1 (0.09%)

Results (Vice President)
Truman (MO): 1,031 (87.67%)
Wallace (IA): 105 (8.93%)
Cooper (TN): 26 (2.21%)
Barkley (KY): 6 (0.51%)
Others: 7 (0.6%)

‹ 1940  ·  1948 ›

The 1944 Democratic National Convention was held at the Chicago Stadium in Chicago, Illinois from July 19 to July 21, 1944. The convention resulted in the nomination of President Franklin D. Roosevelt for an unprecedented fourth term. Senator Harry S. Truman of Missouri was nominated for Vice President. Including Roosevelt’s nomination for the vice-presidency in 1920, it was the fifth time Roosevelt had been nominated on a national ticket. The keynote address was given by Governor Robert S. Kerr of Oklahoma, in which he “gave tribute to Roosevelt’s war leadership and new deal policies.”[1]

Contents

1 Presidential candidates

1.1 Candidates gallery

2 Balloting
3 The vice-presidential nomination
4 In popular culture
5 References

5.1 Bibliograohy

6 External links

Presidential candidates[edit]
Candidates gallery[edit]

Senator
Harry F. Byrd
of Virginia
(Did not actively run)

Unlike the previous convention, President Roosevelt faced no serious opposition for a fourth term, with the country’s active involvement in World War II and the consequent need for stable leadership considered a more pressing issue than any concerns about his remaining in office. Several Southern delegates who were opposed to Roosevelt’s racial policies tried to draft Virginia senator Harry F. Byrd to run for the Presidential nomination, but Byrd decided against actively campaigning against the President. In the end, Byrd did win more delegates than any of the candidates who had tried to run against Roosevelt four years prior, but this still fell far sho

Jungle de Ikou!

This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. (Learn how and when to remove these template messages)

This article’s plot summary may be too long or excessively detailed. Please help improve it by removing unnecessary details and making it more concise. (May 2013) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

This article consists almost entirely of a plot summary. It should be expanded to provide more balanced coverage that includes real-world context. Please edit the article to focus on discussing the work rather than merely reiterating the plot. (May 2013) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

This article describes a work or element of fiction in a primarily in-universe style. Please help rewrite it to explain the fiction more clearly and provide non-fictional perspective. (May 2013) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

(Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Jungle de Ikou

ジャングルDEいこう!
(Janguru de Ikō!)

Genre
Comedy, Magical Girl

Original video animation

Directed by
Yuji Moriyama

Studio
Studio Fantasia
MOVIC
Star Child

Licensed by

US
AnimeWorks

Released
March 26, 1997 – September 26, 1997

Runtime
30 minutes

Episodes
3

Anime and Manga portal

Jungle de Ikou! (ジャングルDEいこう!, Janguru de Ikō!?, lit. Let’s go to the jungle!) is an animation directed by Yuji Moriyama in 1997. It was licensed in the U.S by Media Blasters and released on VHS in 1999 and on DVD in 2001.

Contents

1 Plot
2 Characters
3 Media
4 Reception
5 References
6 External links

Plot[edit]
The story is centered on Natsumi, a young student from Japan who gains the powers of Mii, the well-endowed fertility goddess of a tribal culture. Natsumi and her friends must save the Earth from ultimate destruction by a “god of ruin”. The series is remembered for its wildly “comedic” moments and fanservice elements.
Characters[edit]

This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (October 2016) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Natsumi Rokudo (六道那柘美, Rokydō Natsumi?)
Voiced by: Eri Sendai (Japanese); Melissa Fahn (English)
Natsumi is a ten-year-old schoolgirl who is given an ancient sculpture by her father. In a dream, the God of Earth, Ahem, a

Changeling (comics)

Changeling, in comics, may refer to:

Beast Boy, a DC Comics superhero who used the codename “Changeling” for a period during his membership in the Teen Titans
Changeling (Marvel Comics), a supervillain who later joined the X-Men

See also[edit]

Changeling (disambiguation)

This article includes a list of related items that share the same name (or similar names).
If an internal link incorrectly led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

부천오피

Nomia aurata

Nomia aurata

Conservation status

Endangered (IUCN 3.1)

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Animalia

Phylum:
Arthropoda

Class:
Insecta

Order:
Hymenoptera

Family:
Halictidae

Subfamily:
Nomiinae

Genus:
Nomia

Subgenus:
Gnathonomia

Species:
N. aurata

Binomial name

Nomia aurata
Bingham, 1897

Synonyms

Nomia nasicana
Nomia crassiuscula
Nomia perconcinna
Gnathonomia nasicana

Nomia aurata is a species of bees in the genus Nomia, of the family Halictidae.
References[edit]

http://www.sljol.info/index.php/CJSBS/article/viewFile/496/534
http://www.academia.edu/7390502/AN_UPDATED_CHECKLIST_OF_BEES_OF_SRI_LANKA_WITH_NEW_RECORDS

This bee-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v
t
e

중국야동

Felicità (album)

Felicità

Studio album by Al Bano and Romina Power

Released
1982

Genre
Pop

Label
Baby

Producer
Dario Farina

Al Bano and Romina Power chronology

Aria pura
(1979)
Felicità
(1982)
Che angelo sei
(1982)

Felicità (Italian for Happiness) is a studio album by Italian duo Al Bano and Romina Power, released in 1982 by Baby Records. The album was an international commercial success and included two of their biggest hits, “Felicità” and “Sharazan”.
In some territories, it was confusingly released under the title of their previous album, Aria pura, even though the two LPs contained different material.[1] In the Soviet Union, it was released as Al Bano and Romina Power (Russian: Аль Бано и Ромина Пауэр) and the track listing omitted “Prima notte d’amore” and “Caro Gesù”.[2] The duo also recorded a Spanish language version of the album, Felicidad.[3]

Contents

1 Track listing

1.1 Original Italian release
1.2 Spanish release (Felicidad)

2 Chart performance
3 References

Track listing[edit]
Original Italian release[edit]

Side A

“Aria pura” – 3:12
“Felicità” – 3:13
“Prima notte d’amore” – 2:55
“Sharazan” – 4:45
“Il ballo del qua qua” – 2:52

Side B

“Angeli” – 3:25
“E fu subito amore” – 3:59
“Canto di libertà” – 2:45
“Caro Gesù” – 3:30
“Arrivederci a Bahia” – 3:02

Spanish release (Felicidad)[edit]

Side A

“Felicidad” – 3:13
“Nestra primera noche” – 2:55
“Canto de libertad” – 2:45
“Il ballo del qua qua” – 2:52
“Arrivederci en Bahia” – 3:02

Side B

“Aire puro” – 3:12
“Oye Jesús” – 3:30
“Vivirlo otra vez” – 3:59
“Angeles” – 3:25

Chart performance[edit]

Chart (1982)
Peak
position

Germany[4]
17

Italy[5]
4

Netherlands[6]
39

References[edit]

^ “Al Bano & Romina Power – Aria Pura at Discogs”. www.discogs.com. Retrieved 2015-08-24. 
^ “Al Bano & Romina Power – Аль Бано и Ромина Пауэр (Vinyl, LP, Album) at Discogs”. www.discogs.com. Retrieved 2015-08-24. 
^ “Al Bano Y Romina Power* – Felicidad (Cantan En Español) (Vinyl, LP, Album) at Discogs”. www.discogs.com. Retrieved 2015-08-24. 
^ “Offizielle Deutsche Charts” (in German). www.offiziellecharts.de. Retrieved 2015-07-30. 
^ “Hit Parade Italia – ALBUM 1982” (in Italian). www.hitparadeitalia.it. Retrieved 2015-08-24. 
^ “Discografie Al Bano & Romina Power” (in Dutch). dutchcharts.nl. Retrieved 2015-07-30. 

서양야동